Company Updates

DSI Sense Prototype is Ready for Beta Testing

We now have a functional prototype of the DSI Sense that is ready for beta-testing! This version of the sensor has updated software that is optimized for low-power consumption. The coin-cell battery should now last for more than a year, assuming daily checking of the sensor results—which is a lot more convenient than wearable devices that need constant recharging.

How the DSI Sense is used

A typical use case is to place the DSI Sense adjacent to your skin moisturizers so that you can check on the level of external drying stresses on your skin, as measured by the Dry Skin Index (DSI). This index is a function of the indoor humidity and temperature in the room where your sensor is placed. The DSI will change during the course of the year in response to the levels of water vapor in outdoor air. Now, for the first time, you can adjust your skin-care practices in response to external stressors monitored by the DSI Sense.

Features

The DSI Sense uses a high-accuracy humidity and temperature sensor that makes measurements every ten minutes and computes a 24-hour rolling average of the DSI. Thus when you press the “sense” button once, you get the current DSI value as well as the one-day average. Press the button twice in a row and you’ll get the current relative humidity (in %) and temperature. You can use the relative humidity measurement to decide when to use a room humidifier.

Next Steps in DSI Sense Development

As we get feedback from our beta testers, we will make necessary adjustments in the DSI-Sense, including a new form factor that improves how it looks and operates.

Hardware testing of the new DSI Sensor starts!

Work continues on the development of a sensor for monitoring the Dry Skin Index (DSI). A previous blog described the initial design work on the sensor and now I’m happy to report that we have actually received 30 prototype printed circuit boards for testing. Don Wyman of Electronic Design Solutions designed the board’s circuitry, and he is now implementing the software that runs the sensor. Once the sensor units are operational, we’ll have beta testers use them in order to get feedback that will help us improve them.

In other news, I worked with Lexi Steele of Hearthfire Creative to come up with a name for the new sensor as well as an appropriate logo design. Based on that effort, we are announcing with this blog the official launch of the DSI SENSE (see photo below).  Its primary purpose will be to help people easily monitor the drying stresses on skin due to changes in indoor humidity and temperature so that they can proactively implement the appropriate skin care solutions.

Testing has begun with the first printed circuit board for the DSI sensor prototype.

Testing has begun with the first printed circuit board for the DSI sensor prototype.

Design work begins on a device to help people monitor humidity and temperature stressors causing dry skin

We are happy to announce that work has begun on a sensor device that is specifically designed to track the drying stresses on skin caused by changes in relative humidity and temperature. As you probably know, you really can’t sense these drying stresses, and so it’s hard to optimize your skin care to avoid dry, flaky, and even itchy skin.

The new device employs a high accuracy humidity and temperature sensor to compute the Dry Skin Index (DSI), which we developed as an easy-to-use measure of drying stresses. Although a lot remains to be done, our initial design is based on a small form factor (powered by a coin-size battery and uses an LED display) so that it can easily be put in a purse or backpack or placed next to your moisturizing lotions at home.

The easy to view LED screen quickly gives you the current DSI as well as the trailing 3-day average value. No more dry-skin surprises that are caused by exposure to dry indoor air!

The new sensor device for monitoring drying stresses on skin includes a high accuracy humidity and temperature sensor, coin cell battery, microprocessor, LED display, and tactile switch in a compact design. 

The new sensor device for monitoring drying stresses on skin includes a high accuracy humidity and temperature sensor, coin cell battery, microprocessor, LED display, and tactile switch in a compact design. 

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What is the Dry Skin Index (DSI)?

Until recently no index has been available to monitor or gauge the magnitude of indoor humidity and temperature stressors related to the formation of dry skin.  In contrast, the UV Index, which represents the magnitude of ultraviolent radiation exposure from the sun, has been used to provide guidance to people regarding the need for sun protection for years.